Pedersoli Pedersoli
Black powder Magazine
Terminal ballistics of the conical muzzleloading bullet vs modern rounds

We made some terminal ballistic tests with the help of gelatine blocks to compare the killing power of muzzleloaders with hunting loads.

 

We made some terminal ballistic tests with the help of gelatine blocks to compare the killing power of muzzleloaders with hunting loads. We used one of our .54 caliber flintlock rifles and compared the 50 m impact effect of the conical Lyman Plains bullet to a 300 Winchester Magnum cartridge, to an 8x57 JRS cartridge, to a Brenneke fired from a 16 ga shotgun, to a .22 LR Stinger round and to the effect of a hunting bow with hunting arrow head.

 

 

- Red area: The central wound cavity. This is the hole that the bullet actually makes when entering the tissue,

- Yellow area: Damage to the surrounding tissue. This is caused by energy transfer of the bullet as it is slowing down. These are radial cracks in the tissue following the central cavity as a wave. The longer and wider the wave is, the bigger the damage is.

 

Every hunters first rule is to take away the life of the game with as less suffering as possible. The way bullets work is simple. It enters the body, and cuts the veins. The bigger the entrance and exit hole are, the longer and wider the penetration is, and the bigger the damage to the surrounding tissue is, the faster the blood pressure drops, and quicker the game falls unconscious.

 

The drawings does not show the shock effect of the bullets, and the temporary cavity, however the size of the yellow area partly indicates the size of the temporary cavity.

 

The Plains bullet did well. It had the second longest penetration with wide central cavity. Also the damage to the surrounding tissue (energy transfer capability) was comparable to the 300 WinMag and 8x57 JRS rounds. The bullets, when fired above 2500 J of muzzle energy has more than enough killing power for any European big game.

 

 


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